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mimijumi's blog: Better Feeding for all Babies

This Adoptive Mom Was Still Able to Breastfeed

December 15, 2016

  

Tell us about your adoption journey!

My adoption journey started when I left New Zealand and went to live in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in 2010; I was teaching at an International school. Adoption is very common. I had always wanted to adopt, and felt it was the perfect way to complete my family. I registered at the local orphanage, at the local hospitals, and let it be known via word of mouth that I was hoping to adopt. And of course, I prayed! Several months later, the sister of one of my students gave birth to a baby girl. I was contacted by the guardians (her birth mother was 14) and asked if I wanted to adopt the baby. Of course, I said yes!

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Adoption Doesn't Mean You Can't Breastfeed-Who Knew?

November 15, 2016

 

Tell us about your adoption story…

We were matched for the first time in November 2012 and had two months until baby was due. At that point, I had no idea breastfeeding as an adoptive mom was possible. The expectant mom, who was in college five hours away, was very health conscious and wanted baby to have breast milk. She wanted to breastfeed in the hospital and then wanted me to take over as soon as we left. I saw a lactation consultant and began the process.

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November: Celebrating Adoption and How you Choose to Feed Your Baby

November 14, 2016

 

November is a special time for adoptive families -- we celebrate National Adoption Day Nov. 15 and World Adoption Day Nov. 19!

Adoption is a beautiful way to welcome children into your family, whether they’re babies or older children; children from abroad or closer to home; from foster care or through an agency. Adoption can vary so much, just like the shades of skin, ages, stages and personalities of the children you welcome home. Bryan and I adopted our two boys at birth, five weeks apart (have you read our story?). Malachi is Native American, African-American and Caucasian, and Isaiah is African-American. Most passerby see our double stroller and assume twins -- until they take a closer look!  They often have the curiously awkward “How could this be?” question, and we smile and share the story of bringing our family together. Adoption means we didn’t fit the mold: we created a new one!

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Adoptive Mom Builds Bonds through Baby's Feeding

April 12, 2016

 

Becoming a mother through adoption has been an incredible journey. My husband and I adopted two boys, five weeks and two cities apart. They’re our version of twins. Choosing this route (or sometimes, this route choosing you) obviously means that some things that come naturally in biological parent-child relationships require sacrifice and a little creativity. Having always wanted to become a mother, I held onto images of what that would look like -- pregnancy, birth, nursing. With our boys coming to us through adoption, I had to let go of those images and allow new ones of an adoptive family to enter in. I also had to let go of feelings of inadequacy and embrace a different style. But that didn’t mean I didn’t grieve the loss of breastfeeding and physical bonding, it was still real, and that’s OK. I yearned to physically bond with my baby; I just had to think beyond the boob!

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Building Lifelong Bonds with Baby: Adoptive Mom

April 04, 2016

 

Building bonds with your baby can be an emotional endeavor if you are convinced there are only a few basic ways to do it, but relax -- there are plenty! As an adoptive mom of two boys born five weeks apart, we’ve learned to think beyond the boob -- there are so many ways intentionality can lead to strong bonds that bring families together in special, intimate ways that are unique to you.

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Building Bonds with Baby through Knowledge

March 22, 2016

 As moms, we all want the best for our babes, and whether we physically bore our kids or welcomed them through adoption, healthy attachment is a priority for us. In my case, we adopted two boys five weeks apart. Attachment through feeding was definitely a priority of mine for my boys, but I was also thinking about building bonds in other ways and the challenges our unique family faced. We’re white, they’re biracial and African American, respectively. So not only was I concerned about bonding with my boys as babies -- after all, I didn’t birth them and I wasn’t breastfeeding them -- forming healthy attachment with them as future boys and men was on my heart, too. How would our different ethnicities create a natural barrier? Would our choice of open adoption mean they’d be “too” bonded to their birth parents and thus take away from our connection?

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Milk Sharing-An Adoption Story

January 01, 2016

 

Bryan and I felt moved to adopt after a few years of trying for biological children. We met with a few agencies to no avail, but we knew that we had found “the one” when we met Molly, owner and social worker at Choice Network. We deeply connected with their focus on birth mothers before, during and long after the birth and adoption process. 

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